VR staff participate in National Wear Red Day

 Disability Determination Services staff in Columbia wear red for women’s heart awareness. Three of the individuals pictured are heart disease survivors, each of whom had open heart surgery.

Disability Determination Services staff in Columbia wear red for women’s heart awareness. Three of the individuals pictured are heart disease survivors, each of whom had open heart surgery.

National Wear Red Day is held on the first Friday in February every year to raise awareness about heart disease in women. This is the 15th year it has been observed, and in that time many changes and advances in women’s heart health have occurred:

  • Nearly 90% of women have made at least one healthy behavior change.
  • More than one-third of women have lost weight.
  • More than 50% of women have increased their exercise.
  • 6 out of 10 women have changed their diets.
  • More than 40% of women have checked their cholesterol levels.
  • One-third of women have talked with their doctors about developing heart health plans.
  • Nearly 300 fewer women die from heart disease and stroke each day.
  • Death in women has decreased by more than 30 percent over the past 10 years.
 Staff at the Berkeley-Dorchester office wear red to support the awareness of heart disease in women.

Staff at the Berkeley-Dorchester office wear red to support the awareness of heart disease in women.

Despite this progress, heart disease remains the number one killer of women, causing 1 in 3 deaths each year. That’s approximately one woman every minute. But heart disease does not affect all women alike, and the warning signs for women are not the same as for men. 

The American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement raises awareness about the risks of heart disease for women, provides education so that women can take action to protect their health, and advocates for research about women’s heart health.

Find out more at GoRedForWomen.org.